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How do I help my dog with DMC

Hello I have a dog (breed Egnlish cocker Spaniel).Everything started on Saturday evening, 18th of march. After evening meal he had a nausea. (approximately after 1 hour) After that he again had a nausea, but this time the Bile liquid went out. Eventually dog started to breathe hardly and frequently. We took the dog to veterinary station, and took some X-ray. He also had a little piece of something in stomach. Vet told us that there is no sense doing operation, the risk is too high because he have a Dilated cardiomyopathy(DCM). He also told us that there is no sense to give the dog some drugs,because it won't help. He said that we have to wait until he dies and that's all. We went to other vet in hope to hear recommendations and help. And the other Vet told us that he have liquid in lungs. Dog is too young, 6 years old. We couldn't even imagine that it can happen. Dog almost doesn't eat and drink water. Maybe because of hard breathing.We are giving to dog - dexamethasone, sulfokamfokain, ceftriaxone. That what second Vet told us to use to help dog. Please maybe you can give us some recommendations, you can take a look of his X-rays, and tell us your thoughts and predictions. We will be very thankful !!! Maybe there are some drugs that can help him. Thank you beforehand Best regards

ninininua94

1 Answer

Wow, that is a big heart.

Did your vet perform a cardiac ultrasound, or just the xrays? I would strongly recommend an ultrasound to get an accurate diagnosis - with that heart shape on xrays, I couldn't be sure if it is a DCM or fluid around the heart. An ultrasound would let you know for sure what you are dealing with.

If it is DCM, I would certainly look at medication. Pimobendan would be my first choice as it helps the heart contract, plus makes it easier for the heart to pump blood. If there are signs of abnormal heart rhythms, it may be worth using other drugs such as digoxin. Fluid tablets might also be useful.

bradencollins

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