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Boxer

Bouncy. Energetic. Silly. Despite their tough name Boxers are light-hearted and lively dogs with boundless energy and big goofy personalities. Great as a family pets and highly trainable pups, Boxers make a terrific addition to an active and fun-loving household.

Bring home a Boxer if you are seeking a high-spirited dog whose bad boy exterior hides a soft, gentle and playful heart.

Where I'm From

Boxers were developed in Germany in the late 1800s by breeding the English Bulldog with the German Bullenbeisser, now extinct, and other unknown breeds. Whilst the Bullenbeisser was known as a hunting dog, the Boxer became popular during World War I and II by serving the military as messenger dogs and pack carriers for army troops.

Boxers subsequently became fashionable as show dogs, guard dogs and companion dogs as well as for police and army search-and-rescue. Today, Boxers remain popular dogs and loyal pets.

What I Look Like

Boxers are unique looking dogs with a square head and squashed-in face that sits on a lean, muscular body giving them a tough-guy look. Their stunted muzzles and upturned jowl further adds to the Boxer's cute yet thug-like appearance. Owners used to shape Boxer ears for leaner aesthetics but this is now rare, with floppy ears framing the face.

Boxers have a short shiny coat that comes in fawn (red) or brindle, often with white or tan markings on the legs, chest or face. Boxers also come in a thick bridle, which appears to be black and an all white variety. Many breeders chose to destroy white dogs due to an associated link to blindness, deafness and sunlight sensitivity. Though this only affects a moderate proportion of white Boxers and some of these claims have been refuted.

How I Act

Boxers are very loving and loyal people pets that consider themselves part of the family. They are often vivacious and active dogs that suit a hectic household with older children to play with. Boxers are social animals and do not appreciate too much alone time, when they could become depressed or destructive. They can also be cautious with strangers and suspicious of visitors to the home, who should be introduced slowly.

Boxers are easy to train and can excel at obedience school with a firm and patient master. Training and socialisation should begin early and be consistent to ensure a well-rounded pet. Boxers respond well to fun, positive reinforcement schooling and not harsh scolding when they do something wrong.

Boxers are energetic and fun-loving pets that require at least 30-60 minutes of outside exercise per day to remain fit and healthy. When playing chase with the kids or catching a Frisbee they are in their element. Boxers can get so overexcited they knock things, including children, down so it is important to ensure they get sufficient daily exercise to curb their immense enthusiasm.

Looking After Me

Boxers are usually healthy dogs but can be affected by a number of medical ailments. Boxers unfortunately have a higher propensity to develop cancer. It is especially important to cover white patches on their fur with sunscreen to avoid developing skin cancer or other skin complaints such as lesions. They also may be affected by heart ailments, hip dysplasia and eye problems.

It is advisable to check the temperament and medical history of a puppy's parents and view veterinarian clearance certificates to ensure you get a healthy dog. Be very wary of uncertified backyard breeders.

Boxers have a relatively short lifespan of 10 to 12 years.

They thrive on a high-quality, high protein diet and should be fed twice a day as according to packaging instructions. They sometimes have sensitive stomachs, which can be upset by doggie treats.

Boxers have a short and smooth coat that needs minimal grooming. Though they shed, especially during seasonal change, a weekly brush down will suffice along with the occasional bath. Boxers are also renown for their extra long tongue, which they use to lick themselves clean like a preening cat.

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Cockatiel plucking her feathers

Hi! I hope you can help me with my cockatiel, I write from Spain and here they aren't that common so vets don't know much about treating them. I have a 5 years old female cockatiel and she is very affectionate, 2 years ago I had to spend a couple of months at a hospital and my parents during that time were either working or visiting me, so she felt lonely and started plucking her feathers. Even after I went back home she continued with this behaviour and hasn't stopped. I took her to different vets, they told me to give her small amounts of a syrup that was meant for calming itching and an antibiotic in case it was something producing an itching, but neither worked. I also tried a spray called "Pluck-no-more" with the same results. In case she was lonely we got her a mate, but it may be also female since they don't pay attention to each other at all. She rubs her cloaca on the perch often but the other tiel ignores it (the pet shop said it was male but they said the same with her and then she laid an egg...). The layer that covers the feather while growing (not sure of the name in English) doesn't grow normally, looks more like bland plastic than a hard cover like the ones on my other birds pin feathers (besides her, I have another cockatiel and a lovebird). Is as if the feathers on the plucking areas aren't growing correctly. The areas she plucks are under the wings, the part where wings join the body, and the body area that is covered by the wings while resting. While plucking she lets out small cries. The fluff covers these areas so by just looking at her isn't easy to tell, unless you watch her while preening. I let her play outside of the cage very often, but lately she can't fly well and I think it may be caused by the loss of these feathers. As I said, vets in this area are more specialized in cats and dogs and know little about parrots, so I hope you can advise me since these birds are native to Australia. Is there some kind of balm or spray I can apply on her skin to soothe it? Some medicine I can ask my local vet to use? I love her and it hurts seeing her in pain everytime she preens. Any advice would be much appreciated. Greetings from Spain!